Consumer

Furore over syringes in kids’ desserts

An image shared on Facebook by a concerned Perth parent has sparked furious debate about the newest trend in dessert service – serving the chocolate sauce inside a medical syringe.

Dozens of social media users were appalled at the decision by Subiaco’s Whisk Creamery to use syringes even in children’s desserts, some claiming it served to “normalise” drug taking.

One of the treats Whisk Creamery serves with a syringe full of sauce is called “Banana Addicted”.

Village Counselling clinical psychologist and social worker Jenny Robinson said images of the desserts were disturbing.

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The “Banana Addicted” dessert.

“We are in a drug epidemic and this sends contradictory messages to our children. All kids love ice cream but syringes represent something that harms so many children,” she said.

“It’s going to look a lot like they’re naturalising it.”

Counselling WA head counsellor Sharon Blake said the use of medical syringes in this manner was “unethical”.

Whisk Creamery managing director Simone Nelva-Stellio said the syringes were a practical solution to a long-term problem.

A Whisk milkshake

A Whisk milkshake on their menu

“It’s just packaging. Hot sauce will melt the gelato if we put it straight on in the kitchen,” he said.

Mount Lawley gelato bar Ibiza N2 dessert designer Amed, who did not want his surname published, said he served desserts with syringes to give his customers more options.

“We are in an era where people are more health conscious. This gives people the option to add sweetness if they choose,” he said.

Mr Nelva-Stellio said he understood syringes were used for medical purposes, even sharing his supplier with doctors. But he still preferred to use them instead of pipettes, which hold less sauce.

“They’re a different shape, they’re smaller and don’t handle temperature as well as the syringe. Plus the syringe looks a little bit fancy,” Mr Nelva-Stellio said.

Amed said he did not see syringes as being an issue. The problem was only one of perception, he said.

“Cars are used to race, yet I go to work in my car every day,” he said.